graphicPendula

 

 

Pendula cherry trees bloom from March to April. The sure sign you have a pendula is that the branches are drooping.

Pendula are from family called "Ito-zakura" (thread cherries) which includes these three cultivars:

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Beni-Shidare
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Chrysanthemum
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Snow Fountain

 

 




 

Beni-Shidare - Yeovil street (corner Karen), Burnaby

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Drooping branches are the first sign that the cherry tree is a pendula.

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Notice how the branches and blossoms go down like a cascade?

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Seen from the side.

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Seen from underneath.

 

Beni-Shidare - Van Dusen Botanical Garden

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Beni-Share cherry trees grows on mountains in Japan, so Van Dusen Garden planted them on a hill. The branches are weeping and are filled with delicate five-petal blossoms.

 

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Kiku-Shidare (Chrysanthemum flowered weeping cherry) - Van Dusen Botanical Garden

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Kiku-Shidare cherry trees can be identifiied by their weeping branches and the fact that there are so many petals on the pink blossoms (sometimes up to one hundred) that the flowers look like chrysanthemum (kiku means chrysanthemum).

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Snofozam (snow fountains) - Van Dusen Botanical Garden

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As always, the weeping branches indicate this is pendula cherry tree. Pendulas with white flowers, like this one, are a hybrid called "Snow Fountain" (Snofozam).

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Bonus material: Haiku

 

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